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open_access [2019/03/20 08:33]
86.154.85.123
open_access [2019/03/20 08:34] (current)
86.154.85.123
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 <font 11pt/​Calibri,​sans-serif;;#​0a0a0a;;​inherit>"​A report exploring the implications of Plan S on the scholarly communications industry has been published by the Institute of Scientific Information.</​font> ​ <font 11pt/​Calibri,​sans-serif;;#​0a0a0a;;​inherit>​The report, using Web of Science data, poses questions for the research community, including funders, publishers and institutions. This is the second report in the Global Research series from the recently relaunched Institute for Scientific Information.</​font>​ <font 11pt/​Calibri,​sans-serif;;#​0a0a0a;;​inherit>"​A report exploring the implications of Plan S on the scholarly communications industry has been published by the Institute of Scientific Information.</​font> ​ <font 11pt/​Calibri,​sans-serif;;#​0a0a0a;;​inherit>​The report, using Web of Science data, poses questions for the research community, including funders, publishers and institutions. This is the second report in the Global Research series from the recently relaunched Institute for Scientific Information.</​font>​
  
-=====  Background - introduction to OA    =====+===== Background - introduction to OA =====
  
 <font 11pt/​Calibri,​sans-serif;;#​0a0a0a;;​inherit>​(This introduction is a section from "A beginner’s guide to Open Access"​. By Graham Steel & David Kernohan. WONKHE blog 15 August 2017</​font>​ <font 11pt/​Calibri,​sans-serif;;#​0a0a0a;;​inherit>​(This introduction is a section from "A beginner’s guide to Open Access"​. By Graham Steel & David Kernohan. WONKHE blog 15 August 2017</​font>​
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 As it is only a suite of licences CC does not have anything to do with the assignment of copyright or moral rights – both these should remain assigned to the author of the work in question, though some publishers will require ownership of copyright to pass to them. The UK Scholarly Communications Licence (UKSCL) is one recently proposed solution to this particular issue, simply requiring the author to offer a non-exclusive (CC) license to their institution before publication. After legal advice, a trial is due to be launched soon and will be active in the first-mover universities in September 2017.</​font>​ As it is only a suite of licences CC does not have anything to do with the assignment of copyright or moral rights – both these should remain assigned to the author of the work in question, though some publishers will require ownership of copyright to pass to them. The UK Scholarly Communications Licence (UKSCL) is one recently proposed solution to this particular issue, simply requiring the author to offer a non-exclusive (CC) license to their institution before publication. After legal advice, a trial is due to be launched soon and will be active in the first-mover universities in September 2017.</​font>​
  
-====  Flavours of OA   ​====+==== Flavours of OA ====
  
 <font 11pt/​Calibri,​sans-serif;;#​0a0a0a;;​inherit>​In general terms – an academic author has two main routes to OA publication. ==== Gold ==== Gold open access concerns publication in a scholarly journal that is either entirely open access or permits open access publication (this latter type is described as a “hybrid” journal). In many cases an article processing charge (APC) is paid on submission or publication to cover the costs of running the journal, but other business models (for example the institutional subscription model used by Open Library of Humanities) also exist. ==== Green ==== Green open access involves a copy of a published article being deposited in an open access repository (basically a big database of articles). Repositories are commonly run by institutions or disciplinary bodies, but examples also exist that are managed by research funders, or run as a general purpose service. Some journals have an embargo period which must complete before a copy of the article is shared – depending on disciplinary norms this can end on the day of publication or months (even years) later. Some journals do not permit green OA, others permit only the sharing of a ‘pre-publication’ version that does not include the final edits made before publication.\\ <font 11pt/​Calibri,​sans-serif;;#​0a0a0a;;​inherit>​In general terms – an academic author has two main routes to OA publication. ==== Gold ==== Gold open access concerns publication in a scholarly journal that is either entirely open access or permits open access publication (this latter type is described as a “hybrid” journal). In many cases an article processing charge (APC) is paid on submission or publication to cover the costs of running the journal, but other business models (for example the institutional subscription model used by Open Library of Humanities) also exist. ==== Green ==== Green open access involves a copy of a published article being deposited in an open access repository (basically a big database of articles). Repositories are commonly run by institutions or disciplinary bodies, but examples also exist that are managed by research funders, or run as a general purpose service. Some journals have an embargo period which must complete before a copy of the article is shared – depending on disciplinary norms this can end on the day of publication or months (even years) later. Some journals do not permit green OA, others permit only the sharing of a ‘pre-publication’ version that does not include the final edits made before publication.\\
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 Some large publishers continue to resist change, and we have seen lobbying efforts and misinformation against OA, and seen the unfortunate side effect that promising experiments using text and data mining research tools have often been blocked. Academia has drifted from tolerance to outright antipathy for the worst of perceived rent-seeking practices – we have seen numerous campaigns and boycotts.</​font>​ Some large publishers continue to resist change, and we have seen lobbying efforts and misinformation against OA, and seen the unfortunate side effect that promising experiments using text and data mining research tools have often been blocked. Academia has drifted from tolerance to outright antipathy for the worst of perceived rent-seeking practices – we have seen numerous campaigns and boycotts.</​font>​
  
-==== \\ +<​font ​14.6667px/inherit;;inherit;;​inherit>​Open Access 2020</​font>​\\
-<​font ​11pt/Calibri,​sans-serif;;#0a0a0a;;​inherit>​Open Access 2020</​font> ​ ​==== +
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 <font 11pt/​Calibri,​sans-serif;;#​0a0a0a;;​inherit>​Open Access 2020 is an international initiative that aims to induce the swift, smooth and scholarly-oriented transformation of today’s scholarly journals from subscription to open access publishing.\\ <font 11pt/​Calibri,​sans-serif;;#​0a0a0a;;​inherit>​Open Access 2020 is an international initiative that aims to induce the swift, smooth and scholarly-oriented transformation of today’s scholarly journals from subscription to open access publishing.\\
 The principles of this initiative were discussed and agreed upon at the Berlin 12 Conference on 8-9 December 2015 and are embodied in an Expression of Interest, which has already been endorsed by numerous international scholarly organizations.\\ The principles of this initiative were discussed and agreed upon at the Berlin 12 Conference on 8-9 December 2015 and are embodied in an Expression of Interest, which has already been endorsed by numerous international scholarly organizations.\\
open_access.1553085202.txt.gz · Last modified: 2019/03/20 08:33 by 86.154.85.123